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OWC DIY Data Doubler Kits: Versatility Limited Only by Creativity

Thursday, November 21st, 2013 | Author:

prod_datadoubler-bundle-ssd3gelectraAt OWC, we make it as easy as possible for you to “double your data” on your own terms. If you want to add a second internal drive or add a Solid State Drive (SSD), then we have an OWC DIY Data Doubler Kit that is right for you!

What can “Data Doubler” mean for you? Well, that depends on what your needs are. You can add up to an additional 1.5TB of internal storage, install an SSD for nearly instant boot and app loads or even create a RAID array. There are plenty of other interesting options as well.

The OWC DIY Data Doubler Kits include everything you need to configure your Mac to best suit your needs. Our highly rated DIY Data Doubler Kits are a simple, affordable way to enhance performance, capacity and security.

All of this flexibility is right at your fingertips when you upgrade your MacBook, MacBook Pro or Mac mini with an OWC DIY Data Doubler Kit. OWC also offers install videos for all of our Data Doublers to help walk you through the process of adding one to your system. Once installed, the drive is recognized like any other high-speed SATA storage device. It’s really that easy!

Of course, it’s up to you to decide how one of our Data Doublers would best serve you. That’s why we broke down and explained a few of the different options for you:

Article Continues…

Category: Tech Tips

Further Fusion Testing

Friday, September 13th, 2013 | Author:

stopwatchSince Apple released their Fusion Drive, there have been a lot blogs focused on how to make a DIY (Do it Yourself) Fusion Drive for non-Fusion-Drive-equipped macs, but very few blogs showing a Fusion Drive’s performance in action.

Apple’s description of Fusion Drive really makes it sound fantastic: having frequently accessed files automatically stored on the SSD while infrequently used files are kept on the HDD.  As Apple describes Fusion Drive, “…That’s because frequently used items are kept at the ready on speedy flash storage, while infrequently accessed items go to the hard drive. The file transfers take place in the background, so you won’t even notice.” The other half of the performance benefit is that Fusion Drives maintain a 4GB buffer space on the SSD.  This means files written to the Fusion Drive are written to the SSD first and then migrated to the HDD when the drive is idle.

This automated file management really piqued my interest and there has been talk of the automated file transfer not working. I wanted to put it to the test personally and see this file transfer in action. Article Continues…

OS X 10.8.3 Now Offers Fusion Drive Possibilities For Non-Fusion Drive Equipped Macs

Monday, March 25th, 2013 | Author: , and

We’ve been waiting and waiting for Apple to release the next version of OS X Mountain Lion in hopes that the next full version would have all the necessary components to setup a Fusion drive on any Mac capable of installing a hard drive and SSD together. A little over a week ago, Apple released OS X version 10.8.3 and, with one small caveat, our hopes were fulfilled.

The Profusion Of Fusion Confusion

But before we get to showing you exactly how to setup your own DIY Fusion drive, I’d like to dispel some mis-information that has been floating around the web. Up until now, most of the reports you’ve read about creating your own DIY Fusion drive on a machine have been incomplete. There have been many tutorials on how to create a Core Storage volume that have been labeled as “how to create a Fusion drive”. They are two similar, yet different drive configurations. I’ve addressed a lot of this information in comments on the OWC Blog, but figure it would be a good idea to review and further explain what a Fusion drive actually is as opposed to a Core Storage volume. Article Continues…

Category: Tech Tips

Creating your own Fusion Drive

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012 | Author: and

One of the newest technologies available with the latest Macs is the ability to have what Apple calls a Fusion Drive. This is essentially a Solid State drive and a platter-based drive combined into a single volume. Apple’s underlying Core Storage technology then uses the SSD for the OS and frequently-accessed files, which will benefit from the speed, while placing lesser-used files on the larger, but slower platter-based drive.

The practical upshot of all this is that Fusion gives you roughly the performance of an SSD, while also taking advantage of the plentiful storage of platter-based drives. However, you don’t need to have a Fusion Drive from Apple to do this; with the proper command-line version of Disk Utility, you can create your own array with any platter-based drive and any SSD.

Of course, there are a few caveats to this setup (or the stock Fusion Drive, for that matter) that you should consider before committing to a Fusion setup. We’ll discuss those in a bit. First, though, let’s look at the process of actually setting it up.

Article Continues…

Category: Tech Tips

Special Note for Adding an SSD to a 2012 Mac mini.

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012 | Author:

The “Fusion Drive” option for the 2012 Mac minis can cause some severe data loss if you’re not careful. It’s a bit of a “perfect storm,” but it’s worth noting if you’re adding an SSD as a second drive in your Mac mini.

This particular instance affects you only if:

  • You are upgrading a 2012 Mac mini.
  • That 2012 Mac mini shipped with Mac OS X 10.8.2
  • You are adding an SSD to this Mac mini as a second drive, alongside the existing Hard Drive using an OWC Data Doubler Kit.

If your installation involves all three factors, then you need to pay attention, as your installation will be affected. If one or more of these factors are not involved, then you don’t have to worry, you can proceed as normal. Article Continues…

Category: Tech Tips