Video Commentary: Thinking Differently on 2016 MacBook Pro, Part 2

In October 2016, Apple announced new MacBook Pro models featuring an all new thinner design, a controversial decision to replace all the ports with Thunderbolt 3 USB-C ports, and a much higher pricing structure. A large backlash ensued among the Mac faithful, while at the same time Apple experienced more sales of the new pro laptops than any before. So what gives? Are the laptops terrible, or are they as great as their sales would indicate?

Now that the initial hype has passed, it’s the perfect time to explore what’s new, what’s hot, and what’s not — along with some alternate ideas you may want to consider.

Related: Video Commentary: Thinking Differently on 2016 MacBook Pro, Part 1 and Video Commentary: Thinking Differently on 2016 MacBook Pro, Part 3

About the Video:
This video was shot in UHD 4K using Panasonic LUMIX G7 mirrorless cameras at OWC’s Design and Engineering Studios in beautiful downtown Austin, Texas, and edited in Adobe Premiere Pro on a Mac Pro upgraded with 64GB of OWC memory and OWC storage.


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  • We have two identically configured 15″ MacBook Pro with TouchBar. One was installed 100% from scratch with Sierra, while the other exercised a migration from a 2011 MacBook Pro with El Capitan after the initial Sierra install. There are observable cases where the two machines behave different. The natively installed machine is a consistently excellent performer, while the migrated MacBook Pro behaves sometimes different and is slower. Considering reinstalling the migrated one. (The migration was only done since manual Mail migration is a pain in these days).




  • Currently using an early 2013 MacBook Pro. Love the machine a lot but the graphics are getting long in the tooth.
    I looked at the new MacBooks with a lot of interest. Unfortunately Apple seems to have hit the “sweet spot” of high price and low performance.
    Anemic graphics cards when the PC world is going 10 series Pascal, 16 Gb memory limit and no Kaby Lk CPUs, small SSDs that can’t be upgraded, and all T3 ports that require a handful of adapters. The touch bar is an interesting gimmick.




  • Apple should use standard components and ports, not soldered (RAM, SSD, and if possible CPU and GPU).