OWC Helps Customers Save Big on Upgrades for 2018 Mac mini

[Update 11/01: OWC Docks, Storage and Memory Compatible with the Latest Apple Products]

Apple announces availability of Mac mini 2018, and OWC offers up to 64GB memory upgrades with up to 50% savings versus factory upgrades.

OWC has announced the availability of OWC memory upgrades for the just announced 2018 Mac mini.  

The powerful new Mac mini from Apple features upgradeable memory slots for up to 64GB, and OWC is offering customers incredible savings off factory upgrade prices. New Mac mini owners can save up to 50% on memory upgrades through OWC’s Memory trade-in rebate program. Upgrading memory in a Mac mini boosts performance levels and allows users to run more apps, work with larger files, speed up render times, and manipulate larger data sets. Pre-orders for the memory upgrades are available now.

Pricing:

  • 16GB only $169.99 (save 15% vs factory / 31% with trade-in) OWC2666DDR4S16P
  • 32GB only $329.99 (save 45% vs factory / 50% with trade-in) OWC2666DDR4S32P
  • 64GB only $1079.99 (save 23% vs factory / 25% with trade-in) OWC2666DDR4S64P

Availability:

  • 16GB and 32GB upgrades will be available November 8-9
  • 64GB upgrade will be available November 20-21

“For 30 years OWC has been making it easy for customers to get the most from their Apple computer and is continuing to lead the way with the certified and maximum performance memory upgrades,” said Larry O’Connor, OWC Founder and CEO. “I applaud Apple for making the new Mac mini better than ever with the restoration of life-extending, user upgradeable memory. This allows for exceptional flexibility when they first purchase their Mac mini and enables their capacity to grow as user needs grow — saving ‘green’ and truly being greener by extending the useful lifespan of their computer at the same time.”

OWC is the trusted name in Mac Memory. MacSales.com offers OWC memory upgrades for nearly every current and past Apple notebook and desktop computer manufactured during the past two decades, including iMac, iMac Pro, MacBook, MacBook Pro, and Mac Pro. By maintaining a state-of-the-art test lab, OWC ensures its memory upgrades offer the highest product quality and reliability, backing them with an OWC Lifetime Advance Replacement Program and 30-Day Money Back Guarantee. 

For installation videos on a wide variety of upgrade products for Mac models current and legacy, visit: OWC Install Videos.  


LEAVE A COMMENT


  • Is it possible to upgrade my Mac mini late 2014 which has 4 GB memory now?




  • This article covers user-upgradable RAM, which I understand. However, my question concerns OEM Apple installed solid state hard drives in the new, 2018 Mac Mini. Are these (solid state hard drives aka SSDs) also user upgradable?




  • Any word on how difficult is would be to replace the SSD on the newest Mac Mini? That is, if it is, indeed, replaceable. Is it? Does OWC — or anybody — know?




  • Going to keep my souped up 2tb SSD 16gb Ram 2014 MacMini. Was really looking for the 2018, but just too much $$$ to justify it.




  • Hi,

    There is much conjecture as to whether RAM upgrading the 2018 Mini is a ‘user’ or a ‘service technician’ type of upgrade.

    Do you have any information about this?




    • Watch for the iFixIt breakdown. They’ll have the details. As the owner of a 2012 Mac mini, I suspect the ease will depend on how deeply the RAM is buried.

      https://www.ifixit.com

      On my model it was easily user-doable, as you can see here.

      https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Mac+mini+Late+2012+RAM+Replacement/11726

      Replacing the hard drive with an OWC SSD (an excellent upgrade) was a bit harder but doable. According to iFixIt, replacing the deeply buried PRAM battery takes TWO HOURS. That I have avoided.




      • The iFixit guide in the link is way out of date. The new Mac mini does not have the same easily removable disk on the bottom (https://www.pcmag.com/news/364709/hands-on-apple-finally-updates-the-mac-mini), and the version of the mini before this was not user serviceable at all—so this one is certainly an improvement. The bottom disk on the new mini may or may not be easily removed; that remains to be seen. Once the plate is removed, though, as before the RAM slots are easily accessible.

        What surprises me is the cost of the RAM. Even with the third-party discount it’s still expensive. The reason I suspect is that the RAM is way faster than memory was just a year ago: 2666MHz DDR4, similar to that in the iMac Pro, though that’s described as ECC memory. The regular iMac has 2400MHz DDR4 RAM, still plenty fast. What you don’t get is the same video memory as in the iMac Pro, or even the regular iMac, which in both cases clocks in at 8GB at the high end. Though the specs say you can drive two 4K displays with the mini. And it is eGPU compatible, if you have the extra bucks and must have the extra power.

        One could wish that the SSD was also user upgradeable, as the Apple upgrades are way expensive.

        One thing is obvious however: This is not your grandfather’s underpowered Mac mini. Though you can still get one of those at the low end for $799. This entry level mini has 8GB 2666MHz DDR4 memory, so even it is no slouch. If you need a workhorse, there is a 10 Gigabit Ethernet option. In fact, Apple suggests ganging these together as a “render farm” using 10Gb Ethernet. Their web site shows 10 of them together. Gulp!




    • It is user serviceable, as I’ve owned the 2012 model with the same RAM access point, and it’s a 2 minute job: unscrew base, touch metal base to neutralise static, click out/in modules, re-screw base.

      I even took into Apple for a fix, and they didn’t bat an eyelid about the RAM.

      Apple say it’s “service tech” to cover themselves legally, but it’s really like the tyres on a car; nothing to do with whether the engine is working and needs a fix under warranty, provided they’re in working order.